Hohner & Lee Oskar Chromatic Marine Band Diatonic Harmonicas

February 21st, 2011 Leave a comment Go to comments

Blues Harp – Hohner Harmonica Set

£39.99

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Blues Harp – Hohner Harmonica Set

This set of seven Harmonicas covers the most popular keys for playing blues, country, folk or rock music. Each Harmonica is beautifully finished with chrome plates and numbered reeds for Arrow Method notation. The Harmonicas are supplied in the keys of C, D, E, F, G, A and B flat, with other keys achievable through the cross-harp playing style. An elegant and resilient custom carrying case is included, with zip fastening and individual pockets for each Harmonica.

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Types of Harmonica

There are basically three types of harmonica, though a few more have come into existence with even more modified features.the right selection of the desired harmonica should be based on the style of music one wants to play and the kind of effects he wants to put in. There are 3 basic types: the diatonic harmonica, the tremolo harmonica and the chromatic harmonica.

1. Diatonic Harmonicas This was the first type of harmonica to be created. Although they are most commonly used to play blues and country, one will be able to play all kinds of popular music with a diatonic harmonica.
A diatonic harmonica has 10 holes and permits the player to use the tones and semi-tones equivalent to the white notes on a piano (using the scale of C major as an example) However, it is possible to play other notes by using bending and over blow techniques.

2. Tremolo Harmonicas: This type of harmonica is ideal for playing very traditional music because one may easily create a wonderful ‘tremolo’ effect. It is very popular with Gospel and old world; Folk, Country, Scottish and Irish music.
Tremolo harmonicas are constructed with double holes placed vertically. Each contains two reeds, one slightly de-tuned to the other. When vibrating together, these reeds produce a unique tremolo effect.

3. Chromatic Harmonicas: The chromatic harmonica has been created to compensate for the missing notes on the diatonic harmonica. You will be able to play both the tones and semi-tones of a chromatic scale (a chromatic scale is when both white notes and black notes are played in succession; C, Db, D, Eb, E etc) helped by a slide button.

A few other types of harmonicas are-

OCTAVE TUNED-
Octave harmonicas are similar to Tremolo models in reed layout and musical range. Instead of having reeds tuned to the same note, however, each double hole has one reed tuned an octave apart from the other.

SPECIAL TUNED DIATONICS- This is used for enjoying the advantage of additional notes and scales which are not present in chromatic harmonica.

CHORD AND BRASS HARMONICA- These are two more types of harmonica which are basically used for ensemble performances.

There are thousands of different models present in the market,be it a diatonic or a chromatic harmonica,and different models of different other types of harmonica.harmonicas can be made up of metal or plastic.

For more more information about harmonica types please visit http://www.learn-to-play-the-harmonica.com

Article Source: [http://EzineArticles.com/?Types-of-Harmonica&id=77045] Types of Harmonica

Harmonica Chromatic

£99.99

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Harmonica Chromatic

Hohner’s Super Chromonica features a warm pearwood body with a smooth chrome-plated mouthpiece. This solo tuned 48-reed model has a full three octave chromatic range.

Harmonica Notes – How Harmonica Notes Work and How You Can Get Them to Work For You!

There’s a wide range of harmonica instruments in the world, a wide range of harmonicas being built, and quite often within a particular model of harmonica there is a wide range of keys made for that particular model – therefore there’s a wide range of harmonica notes that can be gotten out of just that one particular model of harmonica.

In general, a harmonica note is sounded by either blowing in one hole of the instrument or drawing (“drawing” being inhale in harmonica-speak). You get a different note drawing in the same hole than you do blowing into the same location.

The most commonly seen harmonica, at least in the US, is the 10 hole harmonica, and it is built with 10 blow harmonica notes and ten draw harmonica notes – a total of twenty notes built-in.
But, at least with the major diatonic harmonicas, you have in the bottom 3 holes (holes 1,2,3) what sounds like an incomplete set of notes.

What actually you have is a setup where blowing holes 1-2-3-4 gives you a major chord for whatever key that harmonica is made in, and if you draw holes 1-2-3-4 then you get a 7th chord a fifth above the blow chord.

So you don’t have the complete do-re-me scale until you start it on #4 blow, but the reason for the chord setup on the bottom octave of the 10 hole harmonica is so that you can accompany yourself – that was the original reason for the incomplete scale/chord setup.

You accompany yourself using the chords on the bottom by using a technique where your tongue is on the harmonica in the middle, and on the left side of the harmonica you blow and draw the chords for the accompaniment and on the right side you play your notes of the melody – this is called doublestop tongueblocking.

This is a much rarer harmonica technique nowadays – most often, people play what’s called first position or “straight harp” style where the root note is the same as the key that the harmonica is built in so that they actually would use the do-re-me scale starting at blow number four.

The other most commonly used way of playing is called second position or “crossharp” style where you are actually playing a harmonica that is is four steps up from the key of the song.

For example, if the song was in the key of C, to play crossharp you would use an F harmonica, because the draw chord on a F harmonica is a C7 chord.

Not to get too deep into positions theory on the harmonica – but it is important to note that you don’t have a complete do-re-me scale on the bottom notes because of the chord setup on the harmonica.

It is possible, though, to use a playing technique called “bending” notes to “bend in” the missing harmonica notes and get that rel=nofollow [http://harmonica.com/]bluesy, soulful kind of sound that way.

The second most common form of harmonica in the world that produces a different type of harmonica note is the Tremolo harmonica, and its’ cousin, the Echo.

What the tremolo and echo harmonicas are set up to do is to produce a double reed sound – tremolo harmonicas instead of having one note sound per hole have instead a double row of holes and have two notes sound when you blow into one of the holes.

The tremolo harmonica is set up to have a shimmery or wavery sort of sound (done by having two reeds a slight pitch difference) similar to what you get by sliding your finger rapidly on the fingerboard while playing the violin. So this gives you a thick sound without having to “work” for it, and is the most commonly type of harmonica played in the Orient.

The Echo harmonica also has double rows of holes and the harmonica notes that the echos produce are an octave apart. So if you have a “c” note hole for blow, one c note would be a middle c pitch and the other c note would be pitched an octave above, still in the same hole position.
So you have this thick harmonica notes sound again but it’s not as “wavery” – it is more like the sound you get with a 12 string guitar.

When you speak of harmonica notes you are speaking of a huge range of keys, models, styles, and types of harmonicas, played all over the world!

Visit [http://harmonica.com/]Harmonica.com and discover a world of harmonica notes in all their forms – instruction, audio samples and video – unique content found no where else on the web.

Article Source: [http://EzineArticles.com/?Harmonica-Notes—How-Harmonica-Notes-Work-and-How-You-Can-Get-Them-to-Work-For-You!&id=1776464] Harmonica Notes – How Harmonica Notes Work and How You Can Get Them to Work For You!

Hohner Marine Band Harmonica

£27.99

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Hohner Marine Band Harmonica

Internationally recognised for its beauty and simplicity, this is the most favoured and famous harmonica in the world. The 1896 features finely chrome plated heavy convex covers and a distinctive pearwood comb, packaged in a plastic hinged case with U.S Marine Band photo.

Lee Oskar Harmonica – C Major Diatonic Harmonica

£29.99

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Lee Oskar Harmonica – C Major Diatonic Harmonica

The Major Diatonic harmonica is the most commonly used tuning for playing Blues, Rock, Country, Folk and Jazz.

Hohner Special 20 Harmonica

£28.99

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Hohner Special 20 Harmonica

A smooth comfortable feeling harmonica the Hohner Special 20 Harmonica has genuine brass plates recessed in a plastic body. The special 20 is an exceptionally warm-sounding airtight instrument with bolted on curves that comes in a hinged plastic case

Hohner: Chromonica 48 G Harmonica Chromatic

£89.99

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Hohner: Chromonica 48 G Harmonica Chromatic

The Chromonica is the classic chromatic harmonica loved by professionals. The high quality of workmanship and material ensure an excellent sound. Comb is made of pearwood or plastic. The models of the Chromonica Series are especially well suited for use in harmonica orchestras, but are also popular as solo instruments.

Hohner: Chromonica 40 Chromatic C Harmonica

£89.99

harmonica sheet music

Hohner: Chromonica 40 Chromatic C Harmonica

The Chromonica is the classic chromatic harmonica loved by professionals. The high quality of workmanship and material ensure an excellent sound. Comb is made of pearwood or plastic. The models of the Chromonica Series are especially well suited for use in harmonica orchestras, but are also popular as solo instruments.

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